SHEILA JORDAN & PAUL MARINARO

(Jordan) "One of the most consistently creative

of all Jazz singers..."
 

-- Scott Yanow, All Music Guide

"Her ballad performances are simply beyond the emotional and expressive capabilities of

most other vocalists.

 

-- New York Times

"A formidable singer, bold and evocative…

Marinaro has evolved into one of the most accomplished and promising jazz-swing vocalists in the country…one of the most beautiful vocal instruments in the business today.

                           -- Howard Reich , Chicago Tribune

"Marinaro takes his place among the top five male jazz vocalists active today"

 

-- Scott Yanow, LA Jazz Scene

Sheila Jordan - vocals

Paul Marinaro - vocals

Jeremy Kahn - piano 

John Tate - bass

George Fludas - drums

Raised in poverty in Pennsylvania's coal-mining country, Jordan began singing as a child and by the time she was in her early teens was working semi-professionally in Detroit clubs. Her first great influence was Charlie Parker and, indeed, most of her influences have been instrumentalists rather than singers. Working chiefly with black musicians, she met with disapproval from the white community but persisted with her career. She was a member of a vocal trio, Skeeter, Mitch And Jean (she was Jean), who sang versions of Parker's solos in a manner akin to that of the later Lambert, Hendricks And Ross.

After moving to New York in the early 50s, she married Parker's pianist, Duke Jordan, and studied with Lennie Tristano, but it was not until the early 60s that she made her first recordings. One of these was under her own name, the other was “The Outer View” with George Russell, which featured a famous 10-minute version of "You Are My Sunshine".

In the mid-60s her work encompassed jazz liturgies sung in churches and extensive club work, but her appeal was narrow even within the confines of jazz. By the late 70s jazz audiences had begun to understand her uncompromising style a little more and her popularity increased - as did her appearances on record, which included albums with pianist Steve Kuhn, whose quartet she joined, and an album, Home, comprising a selection of Robert Creeley's poems set to music and arranged by Steve Swallow.

A 1983 duo set with bassist Harvie Swartz, “Old Time Feeling”, comprises several of the standards Jordan regularly features in her live repertoire, while 1990's “Lost And Found” pays tribute to her bebop roots. Both sets display her unique musical trademarks, such as the frequent and unexpected sweeping changes of pitch, which still tend to confound an uninitiated audience. Her preference to the bass and voice set led to another remarkable collaboration with bassist Cameron Brown, whom she has been performing with all over the world for more than ten years so far and they have released the live albums “I’ve Grown Accustomed to the Bass” and “Celebration”. Entirely non-derivative, Jordan is one of only a tiny handful of jazz singers who fully deserve the appellation and for whom no other term will do.

-- -- --

Chicago-based jazz vocalist PAUL MARINARO, dubbed as having “one of the most beautiful vocal instruments in the business today” by Howard Reich of the Chicago Tribune, is a modern classic. Paul has quickly made a name for himself, becoming one of the most in-demand and respected male vocalists, and taking “his place among the top five male jazz singers active today.” (Scott Yanow, LA Jazz Scene)

Paul demonstrates a mastery of and an infectious passion for the material he chooses, allowing him to successfully command audiences with his fresh interpretations. At home, he is currently enjoying sold-out engagements in Chicago’s world-famous venues, including Joe and Wayne Segal’s Jazz Showcase, The Green Mill, Andy’s Jazz Club, and at Winter’s Jazz Club.

 

He has been a featured performer at The Chicago Jazz Festival multiple times, including a 2017 appearance for an audience of 10,000 on the stage at the massive Pritzger Pavilion, where his performance with jazz legend Sheila Jordan earned rave reviews and was named “Best of 2017” (Chicago Tribune). He has earned “Best Performance of the Year” in the Chicago Tribune in 2013, 2014, 2016, 2017 and 2018; and “Best of Chicago 2015” in NewCity Magazine.

Paul released his widely acclaimed debut album Without a Song (2013), a carefully crafted concept album stemming from and inspired by his father’s unfulfilled dream to have been a professional singer. For this album, Paul incorporated the beginnings of his love affair with music, when at the age of five, he found his father’s homemade 78rpm acetate discs in the attic, heard him singing “That Old Black Magic”, and was mesmerized. This scratchy recording of his father’s voice was Paul’s first musical inspiration...and it was restored and used to open his debut album 66 years later. Without a Song has gone on to receive widespread acclaim and national airplay, was named among the “Best of 2013” in the Chicago Tribune and has been prominently featured on NYC DJ Jonathan Schwartz’s “The Jonathan Channel”. Now in its fourth pressing, the album has been also re-issued as a deluxe, limited-edition, audiophile 2 LP Vinyl set. The album and its story went on to inspire acclaimed choreographer, Ron De Jesus, who premiered his original dance suite “Without a Song: Mic Check 1, 2” (2014), with Paul and his quartet performing the music live. His first live album One Night in Chicago (2015) has also been critically acclaimed, being called “...a shining example of male jazz vocal at the top of its game.” (Midwest Record).

Paul has grown in national visibility in recent years and has enjoyed many highly regarded debuts across the US and Canada, including regular appearances at Toronto’s Jazz Bistro, and most notably at the world-famous Birdland Jazz Club in NYC, where Paul has performed to sold out and enthusiastic crowds. In Chicago, at the stunning Auditorium Theatre, Paul appeared in an all-star celebration of Cole Porter in 2016, and of Ella Fitzgerald and Lena Horne in 2017, and will be a part of Stephen Sondheim program in 2019.

Paul is also a featured vocalist with The Chicago Jazz Orchestra, appearing in many festivals and concerts, including a recreation of the live album “Sinatra at the Sands” at the historic Studebaker Theater for which he received rave reviews, again earning the “Best of the Year” (2018) distinction in the Chicago Tribune.

For his 2018 birthday concert, Paul returned to Birdland Jazz Club featuring special guest Sheila Jordan. The duo immediately demonstrated an uncanny and effortless rapport with one another and have several concerts scheduled together. In early 2019 Paul was the sole vocalist in “The Oscar Peterson Story” at Jazz at Lincoln Center and has been actively touring throughout 2019 for various Nat King Cole Centennial concerts. His many performances in 2019 will include Barbados, Stockholm, the 2019 Rochester International Jazz Festival, and a debut at Jazzhus Montmartre, Copenhagen.

When he is not performing live, he will be busy in the studio recording his next album which is due in 2020.

www.sheilajordanjazz.com

www.paulmarinaro.com

312.344.1270

 

465 N. McClurg Court (promenade)

Chicago, Illinois 60611

info@wintersjazzclub.com

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